MyFXResearch Portal 2019-08-20T09:50:42+00:00

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Results

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITY
STUDY TYPE
LOCATION
CONDITION
AGE
SEX
STUDY TYPE
Study
LOCATION
Arizona, California, Pennsylvania
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Child
SEX
All
STUDY TYPE
Study
LOCATION
Home Only
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Child
SEX
Male
STUDY TYPE
Study
LOCATION
Massachusetts
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Child
SEX
All
STUDY TYPE
Trial
LOCATION
Massachusetts
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Adult 18+
SEX
Male
STUDY TYPE
Trial
LOCATION
California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Child
SEX
All
STUDY TYPE
Study
LOCATION
Illinois
CONDITION
Premutation Carrier
AGE
Child, Adult 18+
SEX
Male
STUDY TYPE
Trial
LOCATION
Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Washington, Australia, New Zealand
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Child
SEX
All
STUDY TYPE
Study
LOCATION
California
CONDITION
Premutation Carrier
AGE
Adult 18+
SEX
Male
STUDY TYPE
Study
LOCATION
Maryland
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Adult 18+
SEX
Male
STUDY TYPE
Trial
LOCATION
Arizona, California, Colorado, Illinois, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Child, Adult 18+
SEX
Male
STUDY TYPE
Study
LOCATION
Home Only
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Child, Adult 18+
SEX
All
STUDY TYPE
Study
LOCATION
Wisconsin
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Child
SEX
Male
STUDY TYPE
Trial
LOCATION
Ohio
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Adult 18+
SEX
All
STUDY TYPE
Study
LOCATION
California, South Carolina, Tennessee
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
SEX
All
STUDY TYPE
Trial
LOCATION
Alberta, Quebec
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Child, Adult 18+
SEX
All
STUDY TYPE
Survey
LOCATION
Home Only
CONDITION
Premutation Carrier
AGE
Adult 18+
SEX
All
STUDY TYPE
Study
LOCATION
Massachusetts, New Hampshire
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome, FXTAS, FXPOI, Premutation Carrier, Non-Carrier
AGE
Child, Adult 18+
SEX
All
STUDY TYPE
Study
LOCATION
Indiana
CONDITION
Premutation Carrier
AGE
Adult 18+
SEX
Female
STUDY TYPE
Survey
LOCATION
Home Only
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome, FXTAS, FXPOI, Premutation Carrier, Non-Carrier
AGE
Child, Adult 18+
SEX
All
STUDY TYPE
Trial
LOCATION
California
CONDITION
Fragile X Syndrome
AGE
Child, Adult 18+
SEX
All

MyFXResearch Portal

The National Fragile X Foundation is committed to helping advance new and improved treatments and interventions for Fragile X-associated disorders. MyFXResearch Portal supports our commitment by eliminating the gap between patients & caregivers and researchers, and by providing guidance, resources, and support for our members and their families throughout the process.

Search Clinical Trials

Matching Heroes to Clinical Trials

Clinical trial heroes are the thousands of people who volunteer every year for clinical trials—the first important step in developing new treatments, interventions, and methods for diagnosing or detecting disease. Polio, tuberculosis, and measles are just three examples of diseases that no longer threaten our daily lives thanks to clinical trials and the everyday heroes that made them possible. However, far too often studies end early or never start because there are not enough volunteers. Our hope is to match willing volunteers—heroes like you—with the right research studies.

Listed below are current opportunities, which can be further refined using the available filters. Also take a moment to review the FAQs & Resources to help you with your decision to participate, or reach out to us to answer any additional questions.

Current Studies & Clinical Trials

Please click through to each research opportunity you’re interested in for full details, including additional requirements for participation. Also note that each of the links will open in a new tab or window, which allows you to return to your search results at any time. 

Marketing Your Research Opportunities

A key goal of the National Fragile X Foundation is to connect patients and families living with Fragile X to the researchers who are leading the clinical trials and research studies. We do this by offering targeted recruitment services through our extensive database and social media presence. Over the last decade, this highly successful service has been invaluable in reaching the Fragile X community and promoting participation in clinical trials, research studies, and surveys; allowing researchers to effectively recruit the necessary qualified participants.

All organizations—i.e., companies, universities, medical centers—requesting marketing assistance with volunteer recruitment must have their projects reviewed and approved through the NFXF Research Review Program.

NFXF Research Review Program

The Research Review Program was set up to assist and support the development of new treatments. NFXF serves as a single point of contact for industry, academic, and other research partners seeking to advance Fragile X-focused treatments and studies at any stage through the Research Review Program.

With an increasing number of current and potential Fragile X research and trials, it is critical that we protect the best interests of patients and their families while optimizing Fragile X participant resources. The Research Review Program provides researchers with access to various Fragile X experts, including members of the Fragile X Clinical and Research Consortium, family stakeholders, FXS clinicians, trialist experts, and outcome measure experts (including members of the NFXF Team) who all function under a confidentiality agreement. Access to these experts through the Research Review Program is tailored to best fit the needs of the researcher.

Submitting a Request

For individuals or organizations developing a research project—clinical trials, research studies, and/or surveys—we recommend submitting a request to take part in the Research Review Program early in the project development stages.

Please email our research team at research@fragilex.org.

Once your project has been reviewed by a committee within the Research Review Program, you will receive a list of FAQs for your organization to complete, which will be used to create the listing on our website MyFXResearch Portal. Additional targeted marketing services for recruitment purposes are also available.

Questions?

Please send us an email with your questions to research@fragilex.org.

Clinical Trials FAQs and Resources

Clinical research involves people (no mice here!) and can be “interventional” (like the search for a new medicine) or “observational” (like filling out a questionnaire). Most of what we know about medicine, and all of the treatments we use, are the result of clinical research.

Clinical research may or may not involve the testing or use of medicinal drugs, aka pharmaceuticals.

Pharmaceutical clinical trials are an important part of making a new medicine. After scientists and researchers spend many years coming up with a new medicine and testing it in mice or other animals, they may get to the point of trying it with people. When this point is reached, it’s called a clinical trial and there are four phases (also see WHAT ARE THE PHASES OF CLINICAL TRIALS?). Note that some medicines are repurposed, that is, they were developed for one condition but researchers now want to use it in a different condition. These types of medicines might also be included in a clinical trial.

Examples of non-pharmaceutical research include:

  • Treatment: Psychotherapy, new devices, or new approaches to surgery.
  • Prevention: Lifestyle changes.
  • Diagnostics and Screening: New or better ways to detect and/or identify a particular condition or disorder.
  • Quality of Life: Ways to improve the quality of life for individuals with a chronic illness.
  • Genetic: Ways to improve the prediction of disorders through how they relate to certain genes.
  • Epidemiological: Seeks to identify patterns, causes, and control of a disorder.

Also see ARE CLINICAL TRIALS THE ONLY TYPE OF STUDIES?

All hospitals and universities that do research have what is called an institutional review board, or IRB. It’s the IRB’s job to make sure that researchers follow all of the rules about research with people. Sometimes, an IRB asks for changes to be made to the study to make sure that participants are better protected. This can make the study start later or go more slowly. Also, every group or institution that joins the study has to get approval from their own IRB, which takes time.

The Food and Drug Administration watches over clinical trials and creates some of the rules for how these studies are run. The FDA is in charge of saying yes or no to any new drug, and researchers have to get approval from both the FDA and their review board before starting a clinical trial. The FDA makes the final decision as to whether the new drug can be sold in the U.S. They look at the results from all of the studies and decide if the medication is safe, and if it works.

Clinical research has many different rules and regulations to make sure that people in the study are respected and treated fairly. For example, if a patient or family is asked to join a study, they can refuse or say no. Participants and their families have to consent, or agree, to be a part of the research. This has to be voluntary, which means that people have to choose on their own if they would like to participate, even if it is being run by their doctor.

Clinical trials are conducted in a series of phases:

Phase I: Researchers test a drug or treatment in a small group of people to learn about safety and identify side effects. To do this, researchers use many different tests, like blood or urine tests, to measure and collect data, but also to make sure people stay healthy.

Phase II: Researchers give the new drug or treatment to a larger group of people to determine its efficacy, which means that researchers see whether it actually works in people. For example, how would researchers test a new medicine that makes it easier to pay attention? Well, they would look at how well someone pays attention before and after taking the medicine. To measure this, they would use surveys or standardized tests that ask very specific questions about paying attention.

Phase III: Researchers give the new drug or treatment to even more people and for longer periods of time to make sure that it works and that there aren’t any serious side effects.

Phase IV: Once a drug or treatment is approved and made available to the public, researchers track its safety in the general population, seeking more information about the benefits and optimal use of a drug or treatment.

Also see WHAT IS A CLINICAL TRIAL?

There are many ethical rules designed to protect people that are participating in research. These rules make sure that:

  • Consent is voluntary (i.e., the person chose and agreed on their own to be a part of the study).
  • Any possible harm to participants is made as unlikely as possible.
  • Researchers use the right study design to answer the questions being asked by the study.
  • Participants can choose to stop participating in the research at any time.

No. There are many other observational studies and trials that do not study a drug, biologic, or device. These are called “non-therapeutic studies,” and they can cover a wide range of topics. Studies that aim to develop a new questionnaire, collect medical history information, or improve quality of care would all fall under this umbrella.

The three main forms of these studies are:

  1. Longitudinal: The information is collected over time.
  2. Cross-Sectional: Many individuals participate, but data collection only happens once for each person.
  3. Case Study: An in-depth look at one or a couple of people.

Non-therapeutic studies are just as important as clinical trials. They help us understand more about a disorder, such as Fragile X syndrome, improve clinical trials, and provide better clinical care.

Some studies are very easy to do—and short! Your local clinic, school, or doctor’s office may have a study going on right now that you could get involved in.

Other studies, especially clinical trials, can come with a big time commitment. It’s important to make sure that completing all of the study activities—which can include phone calls, daily diaries, online forms, and visits to the study site—is feasible for your family. Don’t be discouraged, though! The study team is there to make sure that participating is as smooth and convenient as possible.

Healthy volunteers participate to help others and to contribute to moving science forward so doctors and researchers can learn more about a disease and improve health care for others in the future.

Participants with an illness, disease, or condition also participate to help others, but also to possibly receive new experimental drugs or devices—especially if there are no other treatment options or all other treatment options have failed.

Researchers often need people not affected by Fragile X, which is sometimes referred to in clinical settings as “healthy” volunteers. In the Current Studies & Clinical Trials listed here, these are noted as “Non-Carrier” under the CONDITION column.

Healthy volunteers are needed so researchers can compare results between people with and without a certain disease or condition.

Much of this information may already be made available by reading through each of the trial, study, or survey descriptions, but don’t hesitate to make sure all your questions are answered before you commit yourself or a loved one to a trial. Here’s a list to get you started:

  1. What is the target of the medication or treatment?
  2. Will there be any therapy interventions used along with the medication?
  3. What kind of tests will be done before and after the medication? Is blood work required? How often?
  4. Is it for males, females, or both? What are the ages? Is it okay to be on other (existing) medications?
  5. Do we need to travel? Where?
  6. How many visits are required? How long do they take? Are they flexible?
  7. Does the trial pay for travel costs, such as airfare, hotel, or child care?
  8. Is there a placebo aspect to the trial?
  9. Can taking the medication continue after the trial ends?
  10. Which condition are you looking for, and what about mosaicism?
  11. Is it only for individuals in the U.S.?
  12. Please explain why to get involved?
  13. Why is it important for families to be involved in clinical trials?
  14. What are the qualifications?
  15. Who do I contact?
  16. Will there be a detailed schedule for each visit?

Informed consent is the process of providing key information about a research study before a participant decides whether to take part. The research team provides a document that includes details about the study that explains potential risks. You can then decide whether to sign the document. Taking part in a clinical trial is voluntary and you can leave the study at any time.

No. Please do not post about your experiences on Facebook or other social media outlets. We strongly discourage anyone posting either positive or negative experiences on social media. This will help avoid any type of study bias. We want to do everything possible to have a successful study and potentially bring products to market.

For pharmaceutical clinical trials, patients cannot participate in another trial for a different investigational drug simultaneously.

All the data needs to be analyzed. In other words, all of the data will be looked at to see if there are any patterns that help lead to an answer about the questions being asked in the study. This can take a lot of time and is another reason why it can take so long to get results from a study. Results from clinical trials are often published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, and you can always contact the study team to see if new information is available.

Other than right here on the NFXF MyFXResearch Portal, here are some great places to look, though there will be overlaps:

  • Clinicians and researchers at your nearest Fragile X clinic may already be working on projects that you can help with.
  • Research registries, such as the FORWARD Registry & Database, taking place at a Fragile X clinic  near you.
  • Clinicaltrials.gov: All pharmaceutical trials (and some others) have to register here, and you can get all the latest information on a study such as who is the sponsor, where it’s taking place, even some preliminary results. You can search for “Fragile X syndrome,” or for any other condition you or a family member might have (including FXPOI and FXTAS).
  • Centerwatch.com

We have the following articles available right here on fragilex.org:

Best Practices in Fragile X Syndrome Treatment Development »
In this peer-reviewed article, the authors review key aspects of the process of FXS treatment development with an eye toward ensuring that successful trials of new treatments, incorporating innovative research and stakeholder concerns, can be enacted.

Dr. Elizabeth Berry-Kravis on the Challenges Inherent in a Clinical Trial »
We asked NFXF scientific advisor, doctor, and clinical researcher Dr. Elizabeth Berry-Kravis to comment on the challenges inherent in a clinical trial.

Clinical Trials From Start to Finish (Webinar) »
Sharyn Lincoln and Katherine Pawlowski of Boston Children’s Hospital speaks with us about how clinical research trials work, what it takes to participate, and what happens after the study.

Planning Your Fragile X Clinic Visit »
If you have never been to a Fragile X Clinic or it has been a while, or if you are having issues with behavior, school, or therapies, or if you want to get involved in clinical trials, we suggest you visit one in the near future.

The Fragile X Clinic: What Does It Mean For You? »
Our clinics specialize in all things Fragile X—we get you and your child. Everyone here—clinicians, genetic counselors, social workers, therapists, and all other members of the clinic—knows Fragile X syndrome.

Outside Resources:

Learn About Clinical Trials »
From ClinicalTrials.gov, maintained by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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