The University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Massachusetts-Amherst are conducting a research study to learn about links between learning and language in Fragile X syndrome.

About the Study

Who can participate?

Males with fragile X syndrome ages 9-16 years may be eligible to participate.

What will happen in the study?

If the individual qualifies and decides to be in this research study, they will come to UW-Madison (Wisconsin) or UMass-Amherst (Massachusetts) for a total of two site visits, two years apart.

The following is a list of some of the study procedures that will happen during the study:

  • Language assessments
  • Cognitive testing
  • Questionnaires

What are the good things that can happen from this research?

There will be no immediate benefits to participating in this research.

However, participation will provide the fragile X community and researchers with a better understanding of how language and learning are linked over time. This information could help with future interventions.

Participants will be compensated for their time and travel.

What are the bad things that can happen from this research?

A potential risk of participation includes the potential for a breach of confidentiality, although the study involves protections to minimize such risks. In addition, participants may become embarrassed or anxious when they are asked study questions or are completing study tasks.

There may be other risks that we do not know about yet.

Will I or my child be paid to complete this study?

Participants receive $75 per visit, totaling $150.

Travel reimbursement is available for eligible families.

Interested in Participating?

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